Summer and Winter Teaching

Protocol for Summer and Winter Teaching of ENGL110

Because freshmen are not allowed to take ENGL110 during the summer or winter 5-week sessions, and because the number of upperclassmen who need this required class is shrinking, we do not offer many sections of ENGL110 during these terms. When we do offer these courses, we want to ensure that we give opportunities to as many graduate students and Post-docs as possible.

We will staff these classes by asking for interest from instructors in this order: Full-time faculty, post-docs, graduate students, and then adjuncts. Post-docs and graduate students who have not taught a winter or summer session course will be given preference over those who have done so, with priority given to those who have been at UD the longest.

Because the number of instructors interested in teaching winter and summer sessions exceeds the number of available courses, candidates for these positions need to meet the following requirements:

  • Have taught ENGL110 at UD for at least two regular semesters
  • Have at least 80% participation in their student evaluations
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TRUE Workshop Series

TRUEfinal

There’s still time to become a member of the TRUE Cohort! Our first session is Feb 21 from 2-3:30 in Faculty Commons (Pearson 116).  We will have facilitated sessions that address practical teaching methods for different parts of the research process, as well as group discussions with colleagues. You will come away from the workshop series with activities you can use right away in your classes, as well as a nice line for the professional development section of your CV. Let Alli (atharp@udel.edu) or Lauren Wallis (lwallis@udel.edu) know if you have questions.

You can learn more about the series here, and register here.

News from the Library

At the Spring Faculty Conclave, we had the pleasure of welcoming Lauren Wallis, Amanda McCollum, and Meg Grotti from Morris Library here at UD. Some important takeaways from the presentation, as well as resources that you can use in your class, are listed below.

Scheduling Classes

Library Instruction: Contact Lauren Wallis (lwallis@udel.edu) or use the instruction request form.
Multimedia Instruction: Contact Amanda McCollum (amccoll@udel.edu). If you want to bring your class to the SMDC to work on their projects with you after the multimedia session, you can use this form to request a classroom.

E110 Information Literacy Learning Outcomes

During the planning process for library instruction, your librarian will initiate a discussion about learning outcomes based on your assignment and students’ needs. You are also encouraged to use the outcomes to guide your teaching of the research process throughout your course. We welcome questions about the outcomes and ideas about these can be used in library instruction and throughout a course.
Take a look at the IL learning outcomes here

Arak Videos

Lauren Wallis and her colleagues at the Library have produced a series of seven short video segments with 2017 Arak winners discussing their research process.  Consider using the videos in your E110 class to prompt discussions about the process of writing and researching!
Take a look at the Arak videos here.

Resources for Fall 2017

The Fall Composition Faculty Summit was held on August 28, 2017. Our writing faculty had the opportunity to hear from representatives from CTAL, The Center for Teaching and Learning, as well as Lauren Wallis from Morris Library. The powerpoint presentations that accompanied their talks are included below.

CTAL offers resources and support to all teachers at UD, including events that encourage discussions about teaching and learning. Remaining events this semester include:

  • Friday Roundtables, on October 6th and November 3rd at 3:30pm in 208 Gore hall;
  • TA Teaching and Learning Conversations, on October 9th and November 13th at 12:30pm in the Faculty Commons (116 Pearson Hall);
  • Teaching Freshmen series, on September 27th and October 11th at 12:00pm in the Faculty Commons (116 Pearson Hall).

To learn more about these events and how CTAL can help enhance your teaching, download the powerpoint here, or contact CTAL-info@udel.edu.

Lauren Wallis, First Year Experience and Student Success Librarian, asked how we can support emerging student researchers. She described ways to connect library instruction to class instruction, in order to make sessions with research librarians more productive for students.

You can download Lauren’s presentation here.  If you have questions about how library instruction could fit into your English 110 course, or if you would like to set up an session with a research librarian, contact Lauren Wallis at lwallis@udel.edu. For more information on multimedia library instruction, contact Nico Carver at nico@udel.edu.

Many thanks to all who attended the Fall Composition Summit. We look forward to meeting again in the spring!

FAQ/Reference Info.

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CTAL First Friday Roundtable and Other UD Events

On top of the in-services we hold in the Composition Program and the lectures, workshops, and events of the English Department, there are several other opportunities across campus to talk and learn about teaching and scholarship.

One example is this week’s First Friday Roundtable held by CTAL, where participants will discuss Teaching and Learning grants. A few Composition graduate students already plan to attend and we encourage further participation.  CTAL, along with other UD centers such as the Center for the Study of Diversity, Academic Technology Services, and more, continually create opportunities for great discussion.

While the individual centers post these events on their respective pages, generally the Comp Program also adds them to our calendar. Email Christine Cucciarre to gain access to the calendar.

Brown Bag Multimedia Resources

Our first Brown Bag of the semester on teaching multimedia was a roundtable discussion of different ways that instructors currently teach multimodal assignments in English 110, and we addressed concerns about structuring and grading multimodal assignments. The Student Multimedia Design Center’s representative, Hannah Lee, was present to give access to resources and help with practical concerns. We had a lot of materials present in the Brown Bag that we wanted to make accessible as models for all English 110 instructors.
Caitlin Larracey allowed us to look at her materials, which range from prompts such as the Remediation on YouTube, Social (Re)Media, and Proposal Vlog assignments, as well as supporting materials such as how to work with Storify in the Affordances Discussion Activity. Her materials are included below:
I also shared some of my own materials, particularly the prompts and rubrics I’ve used in my classes to teach multimedia assignments. The Website Prompt and Rubric are an assignment I’ve taught several times now, and I think work particularly well for my goals in a remediation assignment. The Multimedia Prompt and Rubric are for a project I ran once and liked but then changed, and I’m trying the blog assignment in the Daily Work and Participation Prompt for the first time this semester. My materials are included as well:
Finally, Hannah Lee sent over links that may be of use to anyone designing a multimedia assignment, which can be found in the Multimedia Literacy Research guide, in the Faculty Resources section.
She highlights specifically:
  • This video journaling template, from the University of Illinois’ ART 250: Writing with Video course, serves as a useful outline for process-based writing about the video production process.
  • This common rubric from Georgia Tech’s Writing and Communication Program can be used to assess multimodal compositions.
  • The RISE model (Reflect, Inquire, Suggest, Elevate) may be helpful for peer-to-peer critiques and instructor-to-student feedback.

She also points out resources that might be helpful when thinking about multimodal assessment:

  • Digital Writing Assessment and Evaluation contains a collection of chapters on assessing digital compositions. Published by Computers and Composition Digital Press/Utah State University Press. The full text of the book is available for free online. 
  • Computers and Composition devotes an entire issue (Volume 31, March 2014) to multimodal assessment.

Feel free to make use of these materials, and continue to share how E110 instructors are using multimodal projects in our classroom!