Resources for Fall 2017

The Fall Composition Faculty Summit was held on August 28, 2017. Our writing faculty had the opportunity to hear from representatives from CTAL, The Center for Teaching and Learning, as well as Lauren Wallis from Morris Library. The powerpoint presentations that accompanied their talks are included below.

CTAL offers resources and support to all teachers at UD, including events that encourage discussions about teaching and learning. Remaining events this semester include:

  • Friday Roundtables, on October 6th and November 3rd at 3:30pm in 208 Gore hall;
  • TA Teaching and Learning Conversations, on October 9th and November 13th at 12:30pm in the Faculty Commons (116 Pearson Hall);
  • Teaching Freshmen series, on September 27th and October 11th at 12:00pm in the Faculty Commons (116 Pearson Hall).

To learn more about these events and how CTAL can help enhance your teaching, download the powerpoint here, or contact CTAL-info@udel.edu.

Lauren Wallis, First Year Experience and Student Success Librarian, asked how we can support emerging student researchers. She described ways to connect library instruction to class instruction, in order to make sessions with research librarians more productive for students.

You can download Lauren’s presentation here.  If you have questions about how library instruction could fit into your English 110 course, or if you would like to set up an session with a research librarian, contact Lauren Wallis at lwallis@udel.edu. For more information on multimedia library instruction, contact Nico Carver at nico@udel.edu.

Many thanks to all who attended the Fall Composition Summit. We look forward to meeting again in the spring!

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CTAL First Friday Roundtable and Other UD Events

On top of the in-services we hold in the Composition Program and the lectures, workshops, and events of the English Department, there are several other opportunities across campus to talk and learn about teaching and scholarship.

One example is this week’s First Friday Roundtable held by CTAL, where participants will discuss Teaching and Learning grants. A few Composition graduate students already plan to attend and we encourage further participation.  CTAL, along with other UD centers such as the Center for the Study of Diversity, Academic Technology Services, and more, continually create opportunities for great discussion.

While the individual centers post these events on their respective pages, generally the Comp Program also adds them to our calendar. Email Christine Cucciarre to gain access to the calendar.

Brown Bag Multimedia Resources

Our first Brown Bag of the semester on teaching multimedia was a roundtable discussion of different ways that instructors currently teach multimodal assignments in English 110, and we addressed concerns about structuring and grading multimodal assignments. The Student Multimedia Design Center’s representative, Hannah Lee, was present to give access to resources and help with practical concerns. We had a lot of materials present in the Brown Bag that we wanted to make accessible as models for all English 110 instructors.
Caitlin Larracey allowed us to look at her materials, which range from prompts such as the Remediation on YouTube, Social (Re)Media, and Proposal Vlog assignments, as well as supporting materials such as how to work with Storify in the Affordances Discussion Activity. Her materials are included below:
I also shared some of my own materials, particularly the prompts and rubrics I’ve used in my classes to teach multimedia assignments. The Website Prompt and Rubric are an assignment I’ve taught several times now, and I think work particularly well for my goals in a remediation assignment. The Multimedia Prompt and Rubric are for a project I ran once and liked but then changed, and I’m trying the blog assignment in the Daily Work and Participation Prompt for the first time this semester. My materials are included as well:
Finally, Hannah Lee sent over links that may be of use to anyone designing a multimedia assignment, which can be found in the Multimedia Literacy Research guide, in the Faculty Resources section.
She highlights specifically:
  • This video journaling template, from the University of Illinois’ ART 250: Writing with Video course, serves as a useful outline for process-based writing about the video production process.
  • This common rubric from Georgia Tech’s Writing and Communication Program can be used to assess multimodal compositions.
  • The RISE model (Reflect, Inquire, Suggest, Elevate) may be helpful for peer-to-peer critiques and instructor-to-student feedback.

She also points out resources that might be helpful when thinking about multimodal assessment:

  • Digital Writing Assessment and Evaluation contains a collection of chapters on assessing digital compositions. Published by Computers and Composition Digital Press/Utah State University Press. The full text of the book is available for free online. 
  • Computers and Composition devotes an entire issue (Volume 31, March 2014) to multimodal assessment.

Feel free to make use of these materials, and continue to share how E110 instructors are using multimodal projects in our classroom!

Amy Vidali talk and workshop on 9/21 and 9/22: inclusive pedagogy and disability

Amy Vidali, Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Denver, will be visiting UD September 21 and 22. During her time here, she will pick up on conversations begun last year with Jay Dolmage’s visit, including conversations about inclusive pedagogy and disability as an important form of diversity among our students and colleagues.

Vidali’s talk will be Monday, September 21 from 5-6:15 p.m. in 127 Memorial.

Access and Absence: Writing Disability for Higher Education

In this talk, the speaker argues that we must pay more attention to the texts that provide or deny access to higher education, and how these textual access points function for disabled people. The speaker adapts the experience and metaphor of physical accessibility on campus to consider the textual terrain structured by policies and documents, in order to shift the discussion from including disability on campus to recognizing those who never make it to campus. The talk centers on a single textual access point, the college admissions essay, where difference and disability often feature in complex and contradictory ways. The speaker considers the admissions essay of a graduate student with repetitive stress injury which falsely positions disability as only-in-the-past and negates both disability and future accommodations requests. She compares this approach to an undergraduate essay where a student with cerebral palsy displays fierce disability pride and is rejected, then admitted on appeal with a more staid, predictable appeal essay. Placing these two essays in conversation, the speaker identifies how adopting stereotypical tropes of disability helps disabled applicants “get in” and perpetuates damaging understandings of disability in higher education. She argues that this same tension is at play in disclosure decisions when applying for faculty positions and tenure, seeking jobs outside higher education, and making simple textual disclosures between friends and family.

Vidali’s workshop will be Tuesday, September 22 from 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. in the Rollins Room of Jastak-Burgess Hall.

Teaching Styles and Strategies for Disability Inclusion

This workshop offers tangible teaching styles and strategies to create and revitalize inclusive learning environments for disabled college students and all college students. Whether you’re new to universal design or looking for fresh approaches, this workshop provides strategies to put to work right away, from rethinking your disability/access statement on your syllabus and revising writing assignments to encouraging interdependence and questioning the ways your own learning preferences shape and bias the learning environments you create. This workshop is for all faculty and is not focused on disability studies curricula, and participants will leave with a packet they can revisit. The facilitator is a faculty member and disability activist who is both invested and critical of current strategies for including disabled students in college classrooms, and faculty will be invited to share their ideas and experiences. The facilitator asks that you refrain from wearing strong scents to the workshop.

BIO: Amy Vidali is an associate professor of English at the University of Colorado Denver. Her research focuses on the rhetorical politics of disability in university texts, as well as theories of metaphor, gastrointestinal rhetorics, and stuttering. She teaches classes on rhetorical theory, multimedia writing, disability studies, and the teaching of composition. Her work has appeared in College English, Rhetoric Review, The Journal of Medical Humanities, The Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, Disability Studies Quarterly (DSQ), the Bedford St. Martin’s Guide to Disability and the Teaching of Writing, and elsewhere. She is currently working on a book manuscript tentatively entitled Writing for Access: Disability and Textual Terrain of Higher Education.

CCCC Proposal Workshop

Thursday, April 9, 3:30–5:00, 126 Memorial

Please come to our workshop to share ideas and ask questions about presenting at next year’s Conference on College Composition and Communication (Houston, April 6–9, 2016).

To help you start thinking:

  • Introduction to CCCC 2016: Linda Adler-Kassner
  • Call for Program Proposals: Writing Strategies for Action
  • Program: CCCC 2015

Deadline for Proposals: May 5, 11:59 pm

Handouts and Video from Brown Bag: Alternative Feedback Technologies

In case you missed the first Brown Bag of the semester, “Alternative Responses: New Grading and Responding Technologies” (2/17/15), here you’ll find some resources from the session.

  • Click here to download Carolyne King’s handout on using Jing, free screencast software, to give visual and/or spoken feedback to a student on their project.
  • Click here to download Jill Flynn’s handout on using Speed Grader on Canvas to give feedback to students in multiple forms: comments, drawings, highlighting, audio/video recording, etc.
  • Lastly, click here to listen to  Carolyne talking to the Brown Bag group about the potential uses (and limitations) of Jing. (Unfortunately, the projector stopped working halfway through the session so we weren’t able to record Jill Flynn’s discussion of Speed Grader on Canvas.) We hope to use this feature of the Faculty Commons to make future Brown Bags more accessible to those who can’t be physically present.