Upcoming Writing Center Workshops

Come one, come all! The Writing Center is sponsoring a new round of workshops for the Fall 2019 semester. These events will cover issues such as citation and revision as well as skills for crafting effective personal statements for graduate school or another line of work. Please encourage your students to come to these workshops, and if you’re struggling to find approaches for teaching source use or revision in your section(s) of ENGL110, we welcome you to attend and hopefully gain some inspiration as instructors. All three workshops will be held in the Morris Library Writing Center at their scheduled time. Hope to see you there!

For details about these workshops, please refer to the listings below, courtesy of Kathleen Lyons, the Assistant Director of the University Writing Center.


Fall 2019 Writing Center Workshops

“Personal Statements That Pop” by Lee C.

Tuesday, November 5th at 5:00

It’s application season, and you know what that means: Time to write a personal statement that packs a punch. Putting yourself out there in the personal statement, whether you’re applying for grad school, an internship, or a job, may seem challenging, but we will help you craft a statement that really shines. In this workshop, we will discuss tone, style, and audience, how to “brag” about yourself, how to write with or without an essay prompt, what to shout about vs what to leave out, and more! Come to this session, and submit your applications with confidence!

 

“How do I cite this?” by Robert H. 

Thursday, November 14 at 5:00

How do I cite this? Whether you are working with in-text citations or reviewing your Reference List, this is a common question. This workshop will go over why we cite, as well as where you can find resources to make citation easier. Proper citation practice can be tricky, confusing, and time consuming, but it is also very necessary. Attend our workshop to battle those citations together!

 

“Proofing for Polish” by Dorothy S.

Wednesday, November 20 at 11:00

You’ve done the research; developed your point; written and rearranged until you’re blue in the face. Your paper is almost ready to send off to its fate… Except for one more step: proofreading. Ironically, by the time the average paper reaches the proofreading stage, its beleaguered author has spent so long staring at the big picture that they no longer register any of the tiny, niggling details of grammar and syntax that make for rough reading. This workshop will give you tips and tactics to ensure that you can look with new eyes and buff your paper to a high sheen.

Upcoming CTAL Faculty Roundtable — Nov. 1, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

There is a very exciting opportunity on the horizon for instructors looking to learn more about integrating case studies into their classes, which can lead to new strategies for teaching research skills and may help instructors revamp or fine-tune their multimodal assignments in ENGL110. The Center for Teaching & Assessment will be holding its First Friday Faculty Roundtable in Gore Hall Room 208 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. on November 1, 2019. All of these events are brilliant, but this one sounds particularly compelling.

Mark your calendars now! Complimentary food and drink plus a discussion of pedagogical approaches . . . what more could you want?

See the full e-mail from CTAL Assistant Director Rose Muravchick below to register for the roundtable and learn more about it:


Dear Teaching colleagues,
Case studies are stories built around real problems and situations. You can use case studies to teach in almost any discipline, and they are a great way to help students grapple with the complexity of real-world issues. If you’ve thought about incorporating case studies in your courses, but weren’t sure where and how to start, this roundtable is for you.

Join CTAL on November 1st from 3:30-5:00 in 208 Gore Hall where you’ll get a chance to walk through the decisions involved in adopting case studies in your courses, learn where to find repositories of case studies in your disciplines, and ask questions of colleagues who are already using case studies. Designed with input from faculty in multiple disciplines, this roundtable will offer attendees in any department a chance to integrate case studies into an existing course. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss how to implement case study teaching with their colleagues.

https://ctal.udel.edu/programs/ffr/schedule/

2019-2020 Friday Roundtable Schedule | Center for Teaching and Assessment of Learning – ctal.udel.edu

This session highlights University of Delaware faculty and staff from a variety of colleges and the English Language Institute sharing their insights, teaching and advising strategies, and best practices for engaging international students in classes and their academic careers.

ctal.udel.edu

This program is open to all who teach at UD, including faculty, graduate students, instructors and staff. After the event, all attendees will receive a letter certifying their participation which may be included in documentation for promotion or tenure.

Registration is requested: https://delaware.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8G1pbYFb402FJfD

 

UD Library Workshops

This fall, the University of Delaware Library, Museums, and Press are holding a comprehensive array of exciting workshops to engage the campus regarding topics around citational practices, multimedia resources, and more! If you’re interested in using new digital tools in the ENGL110 classroom or simply want to improve on your existing multimodal assignments, there are various opportunities available to you this semester. And graduate students and scholars working on research will want to keep an eye on workshops geared toward helping us manage our many, many citations.

Check out the full list of workshops below. See you there!

UD workshops