Upcoming CTAL Faculty Roundtable — Nov. 1, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

There is a very exciting opportunity on the horizon for instructors looking to learn more about integrating case studies into their classes, which can lead to new strategies for teaching research skills and may help instructors revamp or fine-tune their multimodal assignments in ENGL110. The Center for Teaching & Assessment will be holding its First Friday Faculty Roundtable in Gore Hall Room 208 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. on November 1, 2019. All of these events are brilliant, but this one sounds particularly compelling.

Mark your calendars now! Complimentary food and drink plus a discussion of pedagogical approaches . . . what more could you want?

See the full e-mail from CTAL Assistant Director Rose Muravchick below to register for the roundtable and learn more about it:


Dear Teaching colleagues,
Case studies are stories built around real problems and situations. You can use case studies to teach in almost any discipline, and they are a great way to help students grapple with the complexity of real-world issues. If you’ve thought about incorporating case studies in your courses, but weren’t sure where and how to start, this roundtable is for you.

Join CTAL on November 1st from 3:30-5:00 in 208 Gore Hall where you’ll get a chance to walk through the decisions involved in adopting case studies in your courses, learn where to find repositories of case studies in your disciplines, and ask questions of colleagues who are already using case studies. Designed with input from faculty in multiple disciplines, this roundtable will offer attendees in any department a chance to integrate case studies into an existing course. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss how to implement case study teaching with their colleagues.

https://ctal.udel.edu/programs/ffr/schedule/

2019-2020 Friday Roundtable Schedule | Center for Teaching and Assessment of Learning – ctal.udel.edu

This session highlights University of Delaware faculty and staff from a variety of colleges and the English Language Institute sharing their insights, teaching and advising strategies, and best practices for engaging international students in classes and their academic careers.

ctal.udel.edu

This program is open to all who teach at UD, including faculty, graduate students, instructors and staff. After the event, all attendees will receive a letter certifying their participation which may be included in documentation for promotion or tenure.

Registration is requested: https://delaware.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8G1pbYFb402FJfD

 

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UD Library Workshops

This fall, the University of Delaware Library, Museums, and Press are holding a comprehensive array of exciting workshops to engage the campus regarding topics around citational practices, multimedia resources, and more! If you’re interested in using new digital tools in the ENGL110 classroom or simply want to improve on your existing multimodal assignments, there are various opportunities available to you this semester. And graduate students and scholars working on research will want to keep an eye on workshops geared toward helping us manage our many, many citations.

Check out the full list of workshops below. See you there!

UD workshops

Grading Day!

Please join us for Spring 2019 Grading Day on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 from 9:00AM – 2:00PM in the Dome.

All are invited to attend to work on grading, final projects, or just socialize.

The Composition Program is happy to sponsor this semester-end tradition of food and camaraderie.

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Naylor Workshop for Undergraduate Research in Writing Studies

Call for Proposals: 

Naylor Workshop for Undergraduate Research in Writing Studies

September 26 – 29, 2019
It is a pleasure to announce that the Naylor Workshop on Undergraduate Research in Writing Studies is now accepting proposals for students and mentors for the 6th annual workshop at York College of Pennsylvania. SEPTEMBER 26 -29, 2019.

In its first four years, the workshop has attracted students and mentors from nearly forty states, its participants have gone on to present at various conferences and publish their work, and we have featured leaders in the field’s undergraduate research work as plenary speakers—including Jessie Moore, Joyce Kinkead, Jess Enoch, and Laurie Grobman—and have had many other national experts serving as mentors to participants.

This year, we are thrilled to be welcoming Dr. Jane Greer as our plenary speaker.  Dr. Greer is a former editor of Young Scholars in Writing, and chairs the CCCC Committee on Undergraduate Research.  She is also a wonderful mentor to her students.

The Workshop helps undergraduate researchers in Writing Studies to move their project (which can be at any stage of development) ahead in ways that are richer, more valid, and more theoretically informed.  Attendees participate in mini-workshop sessions to learn a variety of research methods, and work closely with mentors who help them hone their project’s focus.  By the end of the workshop, attendees report, they have a much clearer path forward and a much stronger understanding of our discipline’s work.

We hope you will encourage your students who are engaged with undergraduate research projects in Writing Studies to apply.  Successful applicants also receive free room, food, registration, and funding toward travel.  They need not be writing majors—we have had successful applicants from Writing Centers, from disciplinary courses that focused on discourse analysis, from those engaged in community projects, research on creative writing and publishing, and so on. Like our field’s research, the Naylor Workshop embraces all facets of writing studies.

We also invite faculty to apply to become mentors at the workshop. Past mentors have reported that it is an intensive, exhausting, but fulfilling experience in which they work within an idealized learning space with talented students from across the country. You can join us with students or come on your own. If you have students join you, we will assign them to other mentors for the workshop so that they get multiple perspectives.

Visit the website at www.ycp.edu/naylor for more details.  There, you will find the full Call for Proposals (also attached) and instructions on how to apply as either an undergraduate researcher or a mentor.

Feel free to address any questions to Dominic DelliCarpini, Naylor Endowed Professor of Writing Studies, at dcarpini@ycp.edu.

Teaching Research in Undergraduate Education

Teaching our students how to research is essential but often really hard. How can we present research as messy, circular, and iterative without causing our students to freak out and choose the easiest options? How can we help students develop a more holistic understanding of how to move between Google and library search tools? How can we frame research tools and strategies as skills and resources students can carry forward into other disciplines and future courses? These challenges, among many more, apply to teachers in all disciplines and at all levels and they are central questions to the Teaching Research in Undergraduate Education (TRUE) workshop series.

As a collaboration between the English department and the Library, Museums and Press, TRUE is an opportunity to hone your skills, learn new teaching techniques, and connect with an array of professors, postdocs, librarians, adjuncts, and graduate students from across the university.

The five workshops—focusing on how we approach teaching research, narrowing a research topic, search strategies, evaluation of sources, and synthesis of research—will feature guest speakers and interactive activities all geared toward improving our ability to teach research skills to our undergraduate students, skills integral to UD’s General Education Requirements. Attendance will ensure not only a learning opportunity that can be put to use in your courses, but also a great line on your CV, whether you are looking to increase your professional development or make a case for tenure!

There are two options for participation:

1)    Become a member of the cohort! Your duties under this option are to come to at least 4 out of 5 of the workshops in the series and be ready to interact with your peers. Attendance of at least four sessions will result in a certificate of completion from the English department. This would be a great line on your CV under the Professionalization section.

2)    Become a workshop leader! Do you have great ideas and lesson plans on ways to teach research in the undergraduate course? If so, this is a great option for you! Your duties would be to work closely with Allison Tharp and Lauren Wallis to develop an interactive activity for one of the workshop sessions and then to lead that session. This would be a great line on your CV under the Invited Lectures and Professionalization sections. (Note: workshop leaders can also be participants in the rest of the series.)

If this sounds like an opportunity of interest to you, either as an attendee or a presenter, or if you would like more information, please contact Allison Tharp of the English department (atharp@udel.edu) or Lauren Wallis of the Library (lwallis@udel.edu).

The tentative dates and times for these workshops are as follows: Wednesdays from 2:00-3:30 pm: February 27, March 6, March 13, March 20, March 27. All workshops will take place in Morris Library.

 

Summer and Winter Teaching

Protocol for Summer and Winter Teaching of ENGL110

Because freshmen are not allowed to take ENGL110 during the summer or winter 5-week sessions, and because the number of upperclassmen who need this required class is shrinking, we do not offer many sections of ENGL110 during these terms. When we do offer these courses, we want to ensure that we give opportunities to as many graduate students and Post-docs as possible.

We will staff these classes by asking for interest from instructors in this order: Full-time faculty, post-docs, graduate students, and then adjuncts. Post-docs and graduate students who have not taught a winter or summer session course will be given preference over those who have done so, with priority given to those who have been at UD the longest.

Because the number of instructors interested in teaching winter and summer sessions exceeds the number of available courses, candidates for these positions need to meet the following requirements:

  • Have taught ENGL110 at UD for at least two regular semesters
  • Have at least 80% participation in their student evaluations

TRUE Workshop Series

TRUEfinal

There’s still time to become a member of the TRUE Cohort! Our first session is Feb 21 from 2-3:30 in Faculty Commons (Pearson 116).  We will have facilitated sessions that address practical teaching methods for different parts of the research process, as well as group discussions with colleagues. You will come away from the workshop series with activities you can use right away in your classes, as well as a nice line for the professional development section of your CV. Let Alli (atharp@udel.edu) or Lauren Wallis (lwallis@udel.edu) know if you have questions.

You can learn more about the series here, and register here.

News from the Library

At the Spring Faculty Conclave, we had the pleasure of welcoming Lauren Wallis, Amanda McCollum, and Meg Grotti from Morris Library here at UD. Some important takeaways from the presentation, as well as resources that you can use in your class, are listed below.

Scheduling Classes

Library Instruction: Contact Lauren Wallis (lwallis@udel.edu) or use the instruction request form.
Multimedia Instruction: Contact Amanda McCollum (amccoll@udel.edu). If you want to bring your class to the SMDC to work on their projects with you after the multimedia session, you can use this form to request a classroom.

E110 Information Literacy Learning Outcomes

During the planning process for library instruction, your librarian will initiate a discussion about learning outcomes based on your assignment and students’ needs. You are also encouraged to use the outcomes to guide your teaching of the research process throughout your course. We welcome questions about the outcomes and ideas about these can be used in library instruction and throughout a course.
Take a look at the IL learning outcomes here

Arak Videos

Lauren Wallis and her colleagues at the Library have produced a series of seven short video segments with 2017 Arak winners discussing their research process.  Consider using the videos in your E110 class to prompt discussions about the process of writing and researching!
Take a look at the Arak videos here.